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Noel O'Connell & Irish Literary Society: Displaying Collections: Music

5 different areas in a collection.

A Selection of Music in Ireland

Edward Ledwich (1738-1823) was an Irish historian, antiquarian and topographer. The Antiquities of Ireland was started by Francis Grose but while Grose was visiting Ireland he did. Ledwich then completed the work which was first published in 1791. The second edition of The Antiquities of Ireland (1804) also included a collection of miscellaneous antiquities. 

The Dublin Magazine & Citizen was first published in 1839 by Samuel J. Machen of D’Olier St. Later issues were published by T O'Gorman of 35 Upper Ormonde Street. 

John O'Mahony edited Poetry & Legendary Ballads of the South of Ireland. Writers in the volume include Thomas Condon, Thomas Osborne Davis, Rev. James Delacour, Edward Lysaght, John Clarach MacDonnell, Reverend Francis Mahony, Richard Alfred Millikin and Edward Walsh. Songs included in the volume include: 

  • Jeremiah Joseph Callanan's "Jacobite Songs with Notes." 
  • Mícheál Ó Longáin's "Beside the Lee"
  • Father Prout's "Shandon Bells."

From the late 19th century and through to the 20th century there was a revival in traditional Irish culture, be it in the Irish language as with the Gaelic League, in sport as with the Gaelic Athletic Association, in literature as with the Irish Literary Revival or in music wit the establishment of Feis Ceoil in 1903. All were closely linked to nationalism. 

The Books

Ancient Irish Musical Instruments

Ledwich's Antiquities of Ireland has two chapters on music:

  • "Observations on the Harp and Ancient Music" which covers music in the early Church, perfections of music in the 12th century in Giraldus' Topographia.
  •  "Of Ancient Irish Musical Instruments" which covers a description of the different type of instruments, bagpipes and uileann pipes. 

Ledwich, Edward. The Antiquities of Ireland: With Additions and Corrections. To which is added a collection of miscellaneous antiquities. Dublin: Printed by and for J. Jones, 1804. [Irish Literary Society Collection]

The Dublin Magazine & Citizen

[Native Music of Ireland] contains a number of articles on native Irish music bound together. Many of them are from The Dublin Magazine and Citizen. This journal had a number of titles:

  • The Citizen A Monthly Journal of Politics, Literature and Art, 1839-1840.
  • The Dublin Monthly Magazine, 1842.
  • The Dublin Magazine. 1843.

Indeed The Citizen produced a series of music supplements called ‘The Native Music of Ireland’ from January 1841 to April 1843. 

[Native Music of Ireland] [Dublin : s.n, 184-]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

When Erin First Rose

William Drennan (1754-1820), physician and founder of the United Irishman composed the "When Erin First Rose" in the late 18th century. The poem contains the first recording in print of Ireland as the 'Emerald Isle.' It is set to the tune of "Ardharc na Eire" ("The Standard of Ireland)."

[Native Music of Ireland] [Dublin : s.n, 184-]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

 

"Shandon Bells" by Father Prout

Francis Sylvester Mahony (1804 – 1866) was an Irish journalist and  used the pen name ‘Father Prout.’ He wrote for Fraser’s Magazine which in 1836 published many of his works as The Reliques of Father Prout. "Shandon Bells" is synonymous with St Anne’s Church where Francis Mahony is buried. 

Poetry & Legendary Ballads of the South of Ireland. By various writers; with biographical notices, notes, etc. Cork: Guy & Co., 1894. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

Cover to Four Irish Songs

Four Irish Songs was published c.1910. The linen cover to Four Irish Songs has decorated letters familiar to many from Irish manuscripts. Four Irish Songs is a good example of the Celtic Revival. It is dedicated by the author to the members of the Irish Folk Song Society.

Fox, Charlotte Milligan. Four Irish Songs. Words by Edith Wheeler and Alice Milligan; the Connacht Caoine (in Irish) by Tadhg O Donnchadha; illustrated by Seaghan MacCathmhaiol (John Campbell). Dublin : Maunsel, [19--]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

Title Page to Four Irish Songs

Charlotte Milligan Fox (1864–1916) founded the Irish Folk Song Society in 1904. She was a musician in her own right and collected folk songs and airs throughout Ireland on gramophone. She re-discovered Edward Bunting's papers, donating them to Queen's University Belfast. From these papers she wrote The Annals of the Irish Harpers (1911). Charlotte Milligan Fox jointly edited, with Herbert Hughes, the early issues of the Journal of the Irish Folk Song Society

As with her sister Charlotte, Alice Milligan (1866-1953) was born in Omagh, Co. Tyrone. She was an Irish nationalist poet and writer, and was active in the Gaelic League. Alice Milligan founded with Ethna Carbery two nationalist publications in the 1890s: The Northern Patriot and The Shan Van Vocht (1896-1899).

Edith Wheeler (1867-1920) was another Milligan sister who collected airs and ballads with Charlotte and Alice.

Maunsel are the publishers but the printer was W&G Baird who were known as printers of art, music and Gaelic type.

Fox, Charlotte Milligan. Four Irish Songs. Words by Edith Wheeler and Alice Milligan; the Connacht Caoine (in Irish) by Tadhg O Donnchadha; illustrated by Seaghan MacCathmhaiol (John Campbell). Dublin : Maunsel, [19--]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

The Connacht Caoine

"The Connacht Caoine" is translated into Irish by 'Torna' also known as Tadhg Ó Donnchadha.

UCC Library holds Torna's personal library and his manuscripts. In addition UCC Library Archives Service holds a manuscript letter from Torna which encloses a poem for Conchubar Ó Síotcáin, “Seancas Cléire.”

Fox, Charlotte Milligan. Four Irish Songs. Words by Edith Wheeler and Alice Milligan; the Connacht Caoine (in Irish) by Tadhg O Donnchadha; illustrated by Seaghan MacCathmhaiol (John Campbell). Dublin : Maunsel, [19--]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

Antrim Glen Song

Antrim Glen Song is:

  • Collected and arranged by Charlotte Milligan Fox
  • Words by Edith Wheeler
  • Sung by Miss Lucie Johnstone

The Milligan sisters met Lucie Johnstone when they went to Belfast Methodist College. Lucie Johnstone later trained as a concert singer, teacher and published compositions under the name 'Lewis Carey.' She was involved in the running of the Society of Women Musicians. 

John P Campbell (1883-1962) was a major figure in the Celtic Revival art movement. Some of his earliest illustrations were signed with his Irish name, Seaghán Mac Cathmhaoil. His best known work are in a series of booklets Songs from 'The Four Winds of Eirinn' (1906) written by his cousin Ethna Carbery and set to music by Charlotte Milligan Fox. Campbell's black and white work is reminiscent of wood engravings. 

Fox, Charlotte Milligan. Four Irish Songs. Words by Edith Wheeler and Alice Milligan; the Connacht Caoine (in Irish) by Tadhg O Donnchadha; illustrated by Seaghan MacCathmhaiol (John Campbell). Dublin : Maunsel, [19--].  [Noel O'Connell Collection]

An Gum Catalogue of Music

An Gúm. Catalogue of Music. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair, [19--]. [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Catalogue of Music: Rhoda Cogill

Rhoda Coghill (1903-2000) was an Irish composer and pianist. In 1923 she composed her best-known work Out of the Cradle Endlessly Rocking based on a text by Walt Whitman. Coghill played double bass in the Dublin Philharmonic Society and Radio Éireann orchestras.[ Frm 1939-1969 she was the accompanist of Radio Éireann. Coghill stopped composing in the 1940s; instead writing and translating poetry

An Gúm. Catalogue of Music. Baile Átha Cliath: Oifig an tSoláthair, [19--]. [Irish Literary Society Collection]

 

An Gum Catalogue: Carl Hardebeck

Carl Hardebeck (1869-1945) was a composer and blind from a young age. In 1922 he became the first professor of Music in UCC although he left after a year. In 1932 he began working for An Gúm, the Irish government publisher, as an arranger of Irish traditional songs for piano and choirs. Many of these became school teaching material during the early years of the Irish Republic. UCC Library holds a number of his works

An Gúm. Catalogue of MusicBaile Átha CliathOifig an tSoláthair, [19--]. [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Cover to Irish Minstrels and Musicians

Irish Minstrels and Musicians  is bound in green cloth with gilt and black decorations. Francis O'Neill discusses harp, bagpipe, fiddle, flute, dance; and notes famous Irish musicians through the centuries as well as Irish folk music and melodies. The books is richly illustrated, has a list of authorative sources and an index. 

O'Neill, Francis. Irish Minstrels and Musicians: With Numerous Dissertations on Related Subjects. Chicago: The Regan Printing House, 1913.  [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Endpapers to Irish Minstrels and Musicians

The library rules of the Irish Literary Society Collection are pasted to the endpapers and on the right is an inscription from Francis O'Neill to Alfred Perceval Graves, the Anglo-Irish poet, folklorist and a key member of the Irish Folk Song Society. The inscription reads "To the distinguished Alfred Perceval Graves as a slight tribute from the author. Capt. Francis O'Neill, Chicago, U.S.A., Nov. 19, 1913" and "purchased by the I.L.S., June 1915."

O'Neill, Francis. Irish Minstrels and Musicians: With Numerous Dissertations on Related Subjects. Chicago: The Regan Printing House, 1913.  [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Irish Minstrels and Musicians: Portrait of Francis O'Neill

Francis O'Neill (1838-1936) was a Cork-born Chief of Police in Chicago. O’Neill lived most of his adult life in Chicago, where his life’s work as tune-collector, publisher, writer and supporter of Irish traditional music was carried out. O’Neill collected an extensive personal library, now at the University of Notre Dame, and amassed a huge collection of Irish traditional tunes from his time spent with visiting and resident musicians in Chicago. He is perhaps best remembered for two tune collections in particular: O’Neill’s Music of Ireland: Eighteen Hundred and Fifty Melodies (1903) and The Dance Music of Ireland: 1001 Gems (1907). Richard Henebry described the 1903 collection as the ‘great thesaurus of Irish music’ (1903, 30). O’Neill’s prose writings on Irish traditional music are, arguably, equally as important: Irish Folk Music: A Fascinating Hobby (1910).

O'Neill, Francis. Irish Minstrels and Musicians: With Numerous Dissertations on Related Subjects. Chicago: The Regan Printing House, 1913.  [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Irish Minstrels & Musicians: Portrait of James Goodman

Canon James Goodman (1828−1896) was a native of Dingle, Co. Kerry and was a canon of the Church of Ireland and Professor of Irish at Trinity College Dublin. Of the course of his lifetime he compiled an exceptional music and song manuscript collection, now in Trinity College Dublin. 

O'Neill, Francis. Irish Minstrels and Musicians: With Numerous Dissertations on Related Subjects. Chicago: The Regan Printing House, 1913.  [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Irish Minstrels & Musicians: Richard Henebry

Rev. Dr Richard Henebry (1863-1916) was an Irish language scholar, a fluent Irish speaker and deeply committed to the Irish language, professionally and personally. He was appointed the first Chair of Irish Language and Literature at UCC in 1909 and held the position until his death. Henebry and O’Neill met in Chicago in 1901 and over the next decade admired the work that each was doing. During Henebry's lifetime only a booklet was produced Irish Music: Being an Examination of the Matter of Scales, Modes and Keys with Practical Instructions and Examples for Players (1903) and his monograph A Handbook of Irish Music (1928) was published posthumously by Cork University Press and edited by Professor Tadhg Ó Donnchadha (1874-1949).

O'Neill, Francis. Irish Minstrels and Musicians: With Numerous Dissertations on Related Subjects. Chicago: The Regan Printing House, 1913.  [Irish Literary Society Collection]

Cover to Ár gCeól Féinig

Ár gCeól Féinig contains a variety of traditional Irish airs. 

Ár gCeól Féinig. Collected by an tAthair Pádruig Breathnach. I mBaile Átha Cliath: Brún agus Ó Nóláin, [1920]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]

Ár gCeól Féinig: Maidin Luain Cingcise le Micheal Og O Longain

Mícheál Óg Ó Longáin (1766-1837) has provided this tune. The Ó Longáin family spanned four generations of scribal endeavour in Limerick, Cork and Dublin. Micheál mac Peattair (c. 1693- 1770), his son, Micheál Óg (1766-1837) and his sons, twins Pól (1801-66) and Peattair (b. 1801), and Seosamh (1817-80), and his son Micheál (fl. 1870) were part of a wide network of scholarly endeavour in 19th century Munster. Aside of providing copies of important texts for patrons, they also translated texts from Irish to English and Micheál Óg also composed poetry.

Ár gCeól Féinig. Collected by an tAthair Pádruig Breathnach. Baile Átha Cliath: Brún agus Ó Nóláin, [1920]. [Noel O'Connell Collection]